Milky Way Objects Activity, Part 1: Matching

Jason Kendall, William Paterson University
https://www.wpunj.edu/cosh/departments/physics/faculty/Kendall.html

Below are the list of objects for you to find and name. The different images for a given object will help you in finding both its name and what kind of object it is. You should use various websites below to help you. The Palomar Digital Sky Survey can be actively searched to find the matches. You'll need to use other resources to determine the type of object.

Each object was imaged with a blue filter, a red filter, and an infrared filter. All of the images below are one degree on a side. Each image is unique. It is a process of elimination to discover the type of object. You'll also notice that in some filters, the object is brighter than in others. That appearance will be a clue to the object's nature. For instance, notice that M1 is bright in all three filters, but the Pelican is distinctly not. When you compare M38's three images, one is brighter, showing the stars more clearly. Noticing these differences will be important for part 2 of this laboratory exercise.

Web Links

Do the lab first, and when you're done, and have created a Word Doc or some other typed out format, start up the test. Then, copy your answers into it as you go.

Click on an image to get it in a high-resolution format. You need to search for your objects on the Digitized Sky Survey. Go to that website, and enter the name of the object. Click "Get Coordinates", then at the bottom, choose "GIF" rather than "FITS". Also make the width equal to 60 and the height equal to 60 (arcminutes.) Choose from Red, Blue, or IR from the POSS2 survey. Then click on "Retrieve Image". Match that image with the ones below. You can also try it the hard way by matching it in Google searches. But, that takes a lot longer.

Your Notes
NameNumberTypeOther Names
Barnard 68
Barnard 163
Cone Nebula
Cygnus X-1
IC 434
IC 1396
IC 1805
IC 1848
IC 4604
IC 5070
IC 5146
L977
Messier 1
Messier 2
Messier 3
Messier 8
Messier 13
Messier 16
Messier 17
Messier 20
Messier 29
Messier 35
Messier 36
Messier 38
Messier 39
Messier 41
Messier 53
Messier 57
Messier 62
Messier 67
Messier 75
Messier 79
Messier 80
Messier 92
NGC 40
NGC 246
NGC 281
NGC 457
NGC 663
NGC 752
NGC 869
NGC 896
NGC 1973
NGC 1980
NGC 2024
NGC 2237
NGC 2261
NGC 2264
NGC 2281
NGC 2301
NGC 2359
NGC 2392
NGC 2736
NGC 2808
NGC 3242
NGC 4361
NGC 5139
NGC 5694
NGC 6541
NGC 6543
NGC 6709
NGC 6811
NGC 6826
NGC 6883
NGC 6888
NGC 6910
NGC 6934
NGC 6960
NGC 6992
NGC 7000
NGC 7008
NGC 7009
NGC 7023
NGC 7243
NGC 7293
NGC 7635
NGC 7686
NGC 7789
Objects to Identify
Number Blue Red Infrared
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179

Acknowledgements for the images used in this exercise

The Digitized Sky Survey was produced at the Space Telescope Science Institute under U.S. Government grant NAG W-2166. The images of these surveys are based on photographic data obtained using the Oschin Schmidt Telescope on Palomar Mountain and the UK Schmidt Telescope. The plates were processed into the present compressed digital form with the permission of these institutions.

The Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS-II) was made by the California Institute of Technology with funds from the National Science Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Geographic Society, the Sloan Foundation, the Samuel Oschin Foundation, and the Eastman Kodak Corporation. The Oschin Schmidt Telescope is operated by the California Institute of Technology and Palomar Observatory.

The UK Schmidt Telescope was operated by the Royal Observatory Edinburgh, with funding from the UK Science and Engineering Research Council (later the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council ), until 1988 June, and thereafter by the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The blue plates of the southern Sky Atlas and its Equatorial Extension (together known as the SERC-J), the near-IR plates (SERC-I), as well as the Equatorial Red (ER), and the Second Epoch [red] Survey (SES) were all taken with the UK Schmidt telescope at the AAO.

All images labelled with NOAO are courtesy of National Optical Astronomy Observatory/Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy/National Science Foundation.

All images labelled with AAO copyrighted by the Australian Astronomical Observatory, with photographs by David Malin.